• Boston Red Sox

    The 1975 Red Sox were as colorful as they were talented, with Yastrzemski and rookie outfielders Jim Rice and Fred Lynn, veteran outfielder Dwight Evans, catcher Carlton Fisk, and pitchers Luis Tiant and eccentric junkballer Bill "The Spaceman" Lee.
  • Brooklyn Dodgers

    Jackie Robinson became the first African-American to play Major League baseball in the 20th Century when he played his first major league game on April 15, 1947 as a member of the Dodgers.
  • Atlanta Braves

    The next season, it was only a matter of time before he set a new record. On April 4 he hit #714 in Cincinnati, and on April 8, in front of his home fans, he finally beat Ruth's mark.
  • Kansas City Royals

    In what has come to be known as "the Pine Tar Incident", umpires discovered illegal placement of pine tar (more than 18 inches up the handle) on third baseman George Brett's bat after he had hit a two-run home run off Gossage that put the Royals up 5–4 in the top of the 9th.
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Baseball

Major League BaseballMajor League Baseball, MLB is a professional baseball league consisting of teams that play in the American League and National League. Dating to 1901 and 1876 respectively the two leagues merged in 2000 into a single organization led by the Commissioner of Baseball, after 100 years as separate legal entities.

MLB constitutes one of the major professional sports leagues of the United States and Canada. It is composed of 30 teams, 29 in the United States and one in Canada. All teams in MLB play 162 games each season over six months from April through September. Five teams in each league advance to a four-round postseason tournament that culminates in the World Series, a best-of-seven-games championship series between the two league champions that dates to 1903.

See how each Major League Baseball team came to be in their city, their nickname and their facility.

1869

First Professional Baseball Team

In the 1860s, aided by the Civil War, "New York" style baseball expanded into a national game and spawned baseball's first governing body, The National Association of Base Ball Players. The NABBP existed as an amateur league for twelve years. By 1867, more than 400 clubs were members. Most of the strongest clubs remained those based in the northeastern part of the country. For professional baseball's founding year, MLB uses the year 1869 when the first professional team, the Cincinnati Red Stockings, was established.
1876

Beginning of MLB

In 1876, the National League of Professional Base Ball Clubs later known as the National League or NL was established after the NA proved ineffective. The league placed its emphasis on clubs rather than on players. Clubs could now enforce player contracts, preventing players from jumping to higher-paying clubs. Clubs were required to play the full schedule of games instead of forfeiting scheduled games when the club was no longer in the running for the league championship, which happened frequently under the NA. A concerted effort was made to curb gambling on games which was leaving the validity of results in doubt. The first game in the NL on Saturday, April 22, 1876 at the Jefferson Street Grounds, Philadelphia is often pointed to as the beginning of MLB.
1920

Rise in Popularity and Babe Ruth

Baseball's popularity increased in the 1920s and 1930s. The 1920 season was notable for the death of Ray Chapman of the Cleveland Indians. Chapman, who was struck in the head by a pitch and died a few hours later, became the only MLB player to die of an on-field injury. The following year, the New York Yankees made their first World Series appearance. By the end of the 1930s, the team had appeared in 11 World Series, winning eight of them. Yankees slugger Babe Ruth had set the single season home run record in 1927, hitting 60 home runs; a few years earlier, Ruth had set the same record with 29 home runs.
1947

Breaking the Color Barrier

Branch Rickey, president and general manager of the Brooklyn Dodgers, began making efforts to introduce a black baseball player to the previously all-white professional baseball leagues in the mid-1940s. He selected Jackie Robinson from a list of promising Negro league players. After obtaining a commitment from Robinson to "turn the other cheek" to any racial antagonism directed at him, Rickey agreed to sign him to a contract for $600 a month. In what was later referred to as "The Noble Experiment", Robinson was the first black baseball player in the International League since the 1880s, joining the Dodgers' farm club, the Montreal Royals, for the 1946 season.

The following year, the Dodgers called Robinson up to the major leagues. On April 15, 1947, Robinson made his major league debut at Ebbets Field before a crowd of 26,623 spectators, including more than 14,000 black patrons. Black baseball fans began flocking to see the Dodgers when they came to town, abandoning their Negro league teams which they had followed exclusively. Robinson's promotion met a generally positive, although mixed, reception among newspapers and white major league players. Manager Leo Durocher informed his team, "I do not care if the guy is yellow or black, or if he has stripes like a fuckin' zebra. I'm the manager of this team, and I say he plays. What's more, I say he can make us all rich. And if any of you cannot use the money, I will see that you are all traded."
1968

MLB Logo

The Major League Baseball logo was designed by Jerry Dior in 1968 and was included on all on-field uniforms of Major League Baseball employees beginning in the 1969 season.
2013

Highest Attendance in Professional Sports

MLB has the highest season attendance of any sports league in the world with more than 74 million spectators in 2013.