Toronto Maple Leafs

Toronto Maple Leafs

Maple Leafs Timeline

1917

Toronto Arenas Team Formation

By the fall of 1917, a dispute between Eddie Livingstone, owner of the Blueshirts, and the owners of the NHA's other four clubs the Montreal Canadiens, Montreal Wanderers, Ottawa Senators and Quebec Bulldogs had come to a boil. The other NHA owners were eager to disassociate themselves from Livingstone, but discovered that the NHA's constitution didn't allow them to simply vote Livingstone out. With this in mind, on November 22 the NHA board of directors voted to suspend operations. At the same time, the other four NHA clubs voted to created a new league the National Hockey League. However, they didn't invite Livingstone to join them, effectively leaving him in a one-team league.

However, the other club owners felt it would be unthinkable not to have a team from Canada's second-largest city in the NHL. They also needed a fourth team to balance the schedule, since the Bulldogs were forced to suspend operations due to financial troubles and, as it turned out, wouldn't return until 1920. To solve the problem, NHL president Frank Calder assigned the contracts of the Blueshirt players to a 'temporary' Toronto franchise to be operated by the Toronto Arena Company, who also owned the Montreal Arena. Calder had ordered Livingstone to sell the team, but Livingstone turned down several offers. The Arena Company was given a year to resolve the dispute or lose the franchise. The Arena Company did agree to compensate Livingstone for the use of the players for the season, although no suitable figure was ever reached, and the league itself disputed any claims that Livingstone had on the players.

As the Arena Gardens was the only suitable place to play at the time, the players had little choice but to play for the Arena team, if they wanted to play in the NHL. The NHL had also publicly announced that there was an agreement to buy out Livingstone, though this never took place. The team did not have an official name, but since it was made up mostly of former Blue Shirts, the media and fans called them "the Torontos" or even "the Blue Shirts," as they had Livingstone's former team. Many of the players signed contracts with both Livingstone and the Torontos, and often were paid in cash or personal cheques on a week-by-week basis. Despite this uncertainty, the team was successful from the start. The team won the second half of the 1917 - 1918 NHL season, leading to a playoff against the Montreal Canadiens. The Torontos won the playoff and would then face off against the Vancouver Millionaires for the Stanley Cup. Toronto then won the best of five series 3-2. After the Cup win, the team did not engrave its name on the Stanley Cup. The NHL would later engrave "Toronto Arenas 1918" in 1947. In many books, the name Toronto Arena is listed as the Stanley Cup champion for 1918, but this is technically incorrect because the Toronto Arena Hockey Club was formed after the season.
1919

New Name St. Patricks

In 1919, Livingstone won a $20,000 judgement against the Arena Company, which promptly declared bankruptcy to avoid paying. The Toronto NHL franchise was put up for sale and Querrie put together a group that mainly consisted of the people who had run the senior amateur St. Patricks team in the Ontario Hockey Association the previous year.

The new owners renamed the team the Toronto St. Patricks (or St. Pats for short). Among the officers of the St. Patrick's Professional Hockey Club Ltd. at the start of the 1919 - 1920 season were president Fred Hambly, vice-president Paul Ciceri, secretary-treasurer Harvey Sproule, Charlie Querrie, and player-coach Frank Heffernan. The jersey color was changed from blue to green.

The 1921 - 1922 NHL season led to the St. Pat's only Stanley Cup win. The team finished second to the Ottawa Senators, but caught fire in the playoffs. The St. Pats defeated the Senators in a two-game total goals series 5–4. The team then traveled to Vancouver to take on the Millionaires, winning the series 3–2 and the Cup. The team was led by Babe Dye who scored 11 goals in the 7 playoff games, and John Ross Roach who had two shutouts.
1927

Maple Leafs Born

Querrie lost a lawsuit to Livingstone and decided to put the St. Pats up for sale. He gave serious consideration to a $200,000 bid from a Philadelphia group. However, Toronto Varsity Graduates coach Conn Smythe put together an ownership group of his own and made a $160,000 offer for the franchise. With the support of St. Pats shareholder J. P. Bickell, Smythe persuaded Querrie to reject the Philadelphia bid, arguing that civic pride was more important than money.

After taking control on Valentine's Day 1927 Smythe immediately renamed the team the Maple Leafs. The Toronto Maple Leafs baseball team had won the International League championship a few months earlier and had been using that name for 30 years. There have been numerous reasons cited for Smythe's decision to rename the team. The Maple Leafs say that the name was chosen in honor of the Maple Leaf Regiment from World War I. Another story says that Smythe named the team after a team he'd once scouted, called the East Toronto Maple Leafs.
1947

First 6 Stanley Cup Wins

Stanley Cup - 1947
The 1947 Stanley Cup Final was a best-of-seven series between the Toronto Maple Leafs and the defending champion Montreal Canadiens. The Maple Leafs would win the series four games to two. This was the first all-Canadian finals in 12 years.

Stanley Cup - 1945
The 1945 Stanley Cup Final was a best-of-seven series between the Detroit Red Wings and the Toronto Maple Leafs. The Maple Leafs won the series by 4 games to 3.

Stanley Cup - 1942
The 1942 Stanley Cup Final was a best-of-seven series between the Toronto Maple Leafs and the Detroit Red Wings. After losing the first three games, the Maple Leafs won the next four to win the series 4–3, winning their fourth Stanley Cup. It was the first Cup Final in history to go seven.

Stanley Cup - 1932
The 1932 Stanley Cup Finals was a best-of-five series between the New York Rangers and the Toronto Maple Leafs. Toronto would win the series in three straight to win their first Stanley Cup.

Stanley Cup - 1922
The 1922 Stanley Cup Final was contested by the National Hockey League (NHL) champion Toronto St. Pats and the Pacific Coast Hockey Association (PCHA) champion Vancouver Millionaires. The St. Pats defeated Vancouver three games to two in the best-of-five game series to win their only Stanley Cup as the St. Pats. All games were held at Arena Gardens in Toronto.

Stanley Cup - 1918
The 1918 Stanley Cup Final was contested by the National Hockey League (NHL) champion Toronto and the Pacific Coast Hockey Association (PCHA) champion Vancouver Millionaires. In a series held entirely in Toronto, the Toronto team won the series by three games to two in the best-of-five game series to win the Stanley Cup. It was the first series contested by the new NHL and subsequently the first Stanley Cup win by the Toronto NHL franchise team.
1962

New Ownership

Before the 1961 - 1962 season, Smythe sold nearly all of his shares in Maple Leaf Gardens to a partnership of his son Stafford Smythe, newspaper baron John Bassett and Toronto Marlboros president Harold Ballard. The sale price was $2.3 million a handsome return on his original investment 34 years earlier. According to Stafford's son Thomas, Conn Smythe said years later that he expected to sell his shares only to his son and would not have sold his shares to the partnership. However, it is not likely that Conn Smythe could have believed that Stafford could have raised the money needed to make the deal on his own. This purchase gave the three control of about 60% ownership of the Leafs and Gardens.
1967

Stanley Cup Winners - Next 7 Stanley Cup Wins

Stanley Cup - 1967
The 1967 Stanley Cup Final was a best-of-seven series played between the Montreal Canadiens and the Toronto Maple Leafs. The Maple Leafs would win the series four games to two to win their thirteenth Stanley Cup. As of 2015, this is Toronto's most recent Stanley Cup championship, most recent appearance in the championship final, and with the Chicago Blackhawks ending a 49-year Cup drought with their victory in the 2010 Stanley Cup Finals, is tied for the longest-active championship drought in the NHL with the St. Louis Blues who have never won since joining the NHL in 1967. The 1967 Stanley Cup Final was also the last Stanley Cup Final in the Original Six Era.

Stanley Cup - 1964
The 1964 Stanley Cup Final was contested by the defending champion Toronto Maple Leafs and the Detroit Red Wings for the second straight year. The Maple Leafs would win the best-of-seven series four games to three to win the Stanley Cup, their third-straight championship. There would not be another Game 7 at Maple Leaf Gardens for almost three decades.

Stanley Cup - 1963
The 1963 Stanley Cup Final was contested by the defending champion Toronto Maple Leafs and the Detroit Red Wings. The Maple Leafs would win the best-of-seven series four games to one to win the Stanley Cup, their second straight NHL championship.

Stanley Cup - 1962
The 1962 Stanley Cup Final was contested by the defending champion Chicago Black Hawks and the Toronto Maple Leafs who had last appeared in the Final in 1960. The Maple Leafs would win the best-of-seven series four games to two to win the Stanley Cup, their first since 1951.

Stanley Cup - 1951
The 1951 Stanley Cup Final NHL championship series was contested by the Toronto Maple Leafs and the Montreal Canadiens. The Maple Leafs would win the series 4–1, with all five games going into overtime. It was the Toronto franchise's ninth Stanley Cup win and the last in a series of six wins starting in 1942. It was the first appearance in a string of ten consecutive appearances by the Canadiens.

Stanley Cup - 1949
The 1949 Stanley Cup Final was a best-of-seven series between the Detroit Red Wings and the defending champion Toronto Maple Leafs, the second straight final series between Detroit and Toronto. The Maple Leafs won the series in four straight games to win their third consecutive Stanley Cup and eighth in the history of the franchise.

Stanley Cup - 1948
he 1948 Stanley Cup Final was a best-of-seven series between the Detroit Red Wings and the defending champion Toronto Maple Leafs. The Maple Leafs won the series in four straight games to win their second consecutive Stanley Cup.

Maple Leafs Primary Logo History Maple Leafs Alternate Logo History No Wordmark Logo History

 

Team Information Team History

City:
Toronto

Nickname:
Maple Leafs - Conn Smythe eventually decided on Maple Leafs, for a couple possible reasons. Smythe fought in the Maple Leaf Regiment during World War I, and there was a former Toronto hockey team called the East Maple Leaves.

Arena:
Air Canada Centre 
1999 - present
Maple Leaf Gardens
1932 - 1999
Mutual Street Arena
1917 - 1931

Owner:
Maple Leaf Sports & Entertainment Ltd.
1998 - present
Steve Stavro and Larry Tanenbaum
1996 - 1998
Steve Stavro
1991 - 1996
Estate of Harold Ballard
1990 - 1991
Harold Ballard
1972 - 1990
Stafford Smythe and Harold Ballard
1970 - 1972
Stafford Smythe, Harold Ballard, and John Bassett
1961 - 1970
Conn Smythe
1927 - 1961

Charles Querrie
1919 - 1927
Toronto Arena Company
1917 - 1919

Established: 1917

League History:
National Hockey League
1917 - present

Team History:
Toronto Maple Leafs
1927 - present

Toronto St. Patricks
1919 - 1927
Toronto Arenas
1917 - 1919

Stanley Cups: 13
1966 - 1967, 1963 - 1964, 1962 - 1963, 1961 - 1962, 1950 - 1951, 1948 - 1949, 1947 - 1948, 1946 - 1947, 1944 - 1945, 1941 - 1942, 1931 - 1932, 1921 - 1922, 1917 - 1918

Retired Numbers:
5 Bill Barilko
6 Ace Bailey
99 Wayne Gretzky

Mascots: 1995 - present

The Official Site of the Toronto Maple Leafs
Website
Roster
Schedule
News

*Red is this team's history

Add comment


Security code
Refresh