• Minnesota North Stars Team Formation

    On March 11, 1965, NHL President Clarence Campbell announced that the league would expand to twelve teams from six through the creation of a new six-team division for the 1967 – 1968 season. In response to Campbell’s announcement, a partnership of nine men, led by Walter Bush, Jr. and John Driscoll, was formed to seek a franchise for the Twin Cities area of Minnesota.

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  • Merge with Cleveland Barons

    By 1978 the North Stars had missed the playoffs in five of the previous six seasons. Attendance had tailed off so rapidly that the league feared that the franchise was on the verge of folding. At this point, Gordon and George Gund III, owners of the equally strapped Cleveland Barons, stepped in with an unprecedented solution—merging the North Stars with the Barons. While the North Stars were the surviving team, the Gunds became majority owners of the merged team, and the North Stars moved from the then-five team Smythe Division to assume the Barons’ place in the Adams Division (which would otherwise have been left with only three teams) for the 1978 – 1979 season. The recently retired Nanne was named general manager, and a number of the Barons players – notably goaltender Gilles Meloche and forwards Al MacAdam and Mike Fidler – bolstered the Minnesota lineup. Furthermore, Minnesota had drafted Bobby Smith, who would go on to win the Calder Memorial Trophy as the NHL’s top rookie that year, and Steve Payne, who himself would go on to record 42 goals in his second campaign in 1979 – 1980.

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  • Moving to Dallas

    By 1992, Norm Green was arranging a deal to turn the team into the L.A. Stars, playing at a new arena under construction in Anaheim, California. However, as The Walt Disney Company was already in negotiations with the NHL to create an expansion team in the area, the league instead asked Green to let Disney create the Mighty Ducks of Anaheim while the North Stars would get a relocation approval to wherever Green wanted. In January 1993, Green chose Dallas as the new home of the franchise, and the decision was formally announced on March 10. Several reasons were cited for the relocation, including poor attendance during a string of losing seasons, the failure to reach deals for a new arena in either Minneapolis or Saint Paul, and a sexual harassment lawsuit against Green that resulted in his wife threatening to leave him unless he moved the team. The subsequent decision to relocate the franchise to Texas made Green much reviled in Minnesota, where he derisively came to be known as “Norm Greed.”

    Another factor that also precipitated the move to Dallas was the fact that the team refused to be moved to the Target Center, where the NBA’s Minnesota Timberwolves played, due to the fact that the Target Center had advertising rights for Coca-Cola at their arena, whereas the North Stars and the Met Center had Pepsi as their sponsor.

    Green’s tenure as owner of the Dallas Stars was short-lived as mounting financial problems resulting from poor management plagued his non-hockey business ventures and he was forced to sell the Dallas Stars to Tom Hicks in 1996.

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The Minnesota North Stars were a professional ice hockey team in the National Hockey League (NHL) for 26 seasons, from 1967 to 1993. The North Stars played their home games at the Met Center in Bloomington, and the team’s colors for most of its history were green, yellow, gold and white. The North Stars played 2,062 regular season games and made the NHL playoffs 17 times, including two Stanley Cup Finals appearances. In the fall of 1993, the franchise moved to Dallas, Texas, and is now known as the Dallas Stars.

Established
1967

City
San Francisco – Cleveland – Bloomington Dallas

League History
1967 – Present / National Hockey League

Team History
1993 – Present / Dallas Stars
1967 – 1993 / Minnesota North Stars

1976 – 1978 / Cleveland Barons
1970 – 1976 / California Golden Seals
1967 – 1970 / Oakland Seals
1967 / California Seals

Nickname
North Stars – The name is derived from the state’s motto “L’Étoile du Nord”, which is a French phrase meaning “The Star of the North.”

Championship
Stanley Cup  0
1999

Arena
2001 – Present / American Airlines Center
1993 – 2001 / Reunion Arena

*Bloomington*
1967 – 1993 / Met Center

*Richfield*
1976 – 1978 / Richfield Coliseum

*Oakland*
1967 – 1976 / Oakland-Alameda County Coliseum Arena

Owner
2011 – Present / Tom Gaglardi
1995 – 2011 / Tom Hicks
1991 – 1995 / Norman Green

1989 – 1991 / Howard Baldwin and Morris Belzberg
1967 – 1989 / Walter Bush, Jr. and John Driscoll
1976 – 1978 / Melvin Swig and George Gund III
1970 – 1975 / Melvin Swig (California Golden Seals)
1967 – 1970 / Barry Van Gerbig (California Seals)

Retired Number
7 Neal Broten 
8 Bill Goldsworthy
9 Mike Modano 
19 Bill Masterton
26 Jere Lehtinen
99 Wayne Gretzky

Mascot
2014 – Present / Victor E. Green

*Blue is this team’s history

North Stars History Comments

 

 

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