Vancouver Canucks Primary Logo
  • Vancouver Canucks Team Formation

    Less than a year later, the Oakland Seals were in financial difficulty and having trouble drawing fans. An apparent deal was in place to move the team to Vancouver, but the NHL did not want to see one of their franchises from the expansion of 1967 move so quickly and killed the deal. In exchange for avoiding a lawsuit, the NHL promised Vancouver would get a team in the next expansion. Another group, headed by Minnesota entrepreneur Tom Scallen, made a new presentation, and was awarded an expansion franchise for the price of $6 million, three times the cost in 1967. The new ownership group purchased the WHL Canucks, and joined the league along with the Buffalo Sabres for the 1970 – 1971 season.

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  • New Ownership

    Prior to the 1974 – 1975 season, Scallen and his ownership group from Minnesota sold the team to local media mogul Frank Griffiths for $9 million. Also in the summer of 1974, the Canucks were re-aligned within the league and placed in the new Smythe Division. They responded with their first winning record (38 wins, 32 losses and 10 ties), finishing first in the division with 86 points. Making their debut in the Stanley Cup playoffs, the Canucks lost the opening series of the 1975 post-season in five games to the Montreal Canadiens. Head coach and general manager Phil Maloney (the third GM in team history after Poile and Hal Laycoe) recalled the importance of a successful season for the Canucks in that year specifically, as the rival league World Hockey Association had established another major professional team in the city, the Vancouver Blazers. Competing for the same hockey market, the Canucks emerged over the Blazers as the latter relocated to Calgary, Alberta, the following season. The Canucks posted a second consecutive winning record and made the playoffs in 1975 – 1976, but lost to the New York Islanders in a two-game preliminary series.

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  • New General Motors Place

    Their elimination from the 1995 Stanley Cup playoffs in Game 4 of the second round marked the Canucks’ last game played at the Pacific Coliseum, as the team moved into the new General Motors Place (since renamed Rogers Arena), a new $160 million arena situated in Downtown Vancouver, the following season. Rogers Arena, is an indoor sports arena located at 800 Griffiths Way in the downtown area of Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada. Opened in 1995, the arena was known as General Motors Place (GM Place) from its opening until July 6, 2010, when General Motors Canada ended its naming rights sponsorship and a new agreement for those rights was reached with Rogers Communications. Rogers Arena was built to replace Pacific Coliseum as Vancouver’s primary indoor sports facility and in part due to the National Basketball Association’s 1995 expansion into Canada, where Vancouver and Toronto were given expansion teams.

    The arena seats 18,910 for ice hockey and 19,700 for basketball, with 88 luxury suites, 12 hospitality suites and 2,195 club seats.

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The Vancouver Canucks are a professional ice hockey team based in Vancouver, British Columbia. They are members of the Pacific Division of the Western Conference of the National Hockey League (NHL). The Canucks play their home games at Rogers Arena, formerly known as General Motors Place, which has an official capacity of 18,860. Henrik Sedin is currently the captain of the team, Willie Desjardins is the head coach and Jim Benning is the general manager.

The Canucks joined the league in 1970 as an expansion team along with the Buffalo Sabres. In its NHL history, the team has advanced to the Stanley Cup Finals three times, losing to the New York Islanders in 1982, the New York Rangers in 1994 and the Boston Bruins in 2011. They have won the Presidents’ Trophy in back-to-back seasons as the team with the league’s best regular season record in the 2010 – 2011 and 2011 – 2012 seasons. They won three division titles as a member of the Smythe Division from 1974 to 1993, and seven titles as a member of the Northwest Division from 1998 to 2013.

Established
1970

City
Vancouver

League History
1970 – Present / National Hockey League

Team History
1970 – Present / Vancouver Canucks

Nickname
Canucks – Johnny Canuck, who originally appeared as a Canadian political cartoon character in 1869, was reinvented as a comic book action hero who fought Adolf Hitler, among other villains, during World War II. Canuck is also slang for Canadian, making Vancouver’s hockey team the Canadian equivalent of the New York Yankees—with a little less money.

Championship
Stanley Cup  0

Arena
2011 – Present / Rogers Arena
2010 / Canada Hockey Place
1995 – 2010 / General Motors Place
1970 – 1995 / Pacific Coliseum

Owner
2006 – Present / Canucks Sports & Entertainment
2004 – 2006 / John McCaw, Jr. and Francesco Aquilini
1997 – 2004 / John McCaw, Jr.
1988 – 1997 / Arthur Griffiths
1974 – 1988 / Frank Griffiths
1970 – 1974 / Thomas Scallen

Who is the greatest Vancouver Canucks?

Retired Number
10 Pavel Bure
12 Stan Smyl
16 Trevor Linden
19 Markus Naslund
99 Wayne Gretzky

Mascot
Unknown / Fin the Whale

*Blue is this team’s history

Canucks History Comments

 

 

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