• Tulsa Shock Team Creation

    Tulsa had been mentioned as a possible future city for WNBA expansion, but efforts did not come together until the middle of 2009. An organizing committee with Tulsa businesspeople and politicians began the effort to attract an expansion team. The group was originally given a September 1 deadline. WNBA President Donna Orender extended that deadline to sometime in October. The investment group hired former University of Arkansas head coach Nolan Richardson as the potential franchise general manager and head coach. Richardson was a local favorite; before his successful 18-year stint at Arkansas, he had spent five years as head coach at the University of Tulsa, leading them to the NIT title in his first year. This move was viewed as strange by some, considering that Tulsa had not even secured a franchise before hiring a coach. The investors claimed it was to show the league they were serious about wanting a team. On October 15, 2009, the group made its official request to join the league.

    On October 20, 2009, WNBA President Donna Orender, lead investors Bill Cameron and David Box, Tulsa mayor Kathy Taylor, Oklahoma governor Brad Henry, and head coach Nolan Richardson were present for a press conference announcing that the Detroit Shock would relocate to Tulsa. On January 23, 2010, the franchise announced that the team will remain as the Shock. The colors are now black, red, and gold.

    •  
    •  
    •  
    •  
    •  
    •  
    •  
    •  
    •  
    •  
    •  
    •  
    •  
    •  
  • Shock on to Dallas

    The 2015 Shock started off well, with the team starting 10–7, including a 6–1 record at the BOK Center. However, in June, point guard Skylar Diggins suffered a knee injury and missed the rest of the season. On July 20, 2015, majority owner Bill Cameron shocked not just fans in Tulsa, but the WNBA itself as he announced he will move the team to Dallas. The following day, minority owner Stuart Price filed suit against Cameron in a failed attempt to keep the team in Tulsa.

    On July 23, 2015, WNBA League owners unanimously approved Tulsa Shock’s relocation to Dallas-Fort Worth. The last regular season home game for the Shock in Tulsa was September 13 against Phoenix. While the Shock did make the playoffs, they were still young and were swept in 2 straight by the same Phoenix squad. The new home arena for the Shock in DFW is the College Park Center at UT Arlington, also home to the UT Arlington Mavericks.

    On November 2, 2015 the team name was officially changed to the Dallas Wings. The name stems from the famous Mobil Oil Co. “Flying Horse” atop of a historic downtown Dallas building. Also it is a similar mascot to its local NBA team the Dallas Mavericks.

    •  
    •  
    •  
    •  
    •  
    •  
    •  
    •  
    •  
    •  
    •  
    •  
    •  
    •  

The Tulsa Shock were a professional basketball team based in Tulsa, Oklahoma, playing in the Western Conference in the Women’s National Basketball Association (WNBA). The team was founded in Detroit, Michigan before the 1998 WNBA season began; the team moved to Tulsa before the 2010 season. The team was owned by Tulsa Pro Hoops LLC, which is led by Bill Cameron and David Box. On July 20, 2015, Cameron announced that the franchise would move to Arlington, Texas for the 2016 WNBA season.

Established
1998

City
Detroit – Tulsa – Dallas

League History
1998 – Present / Women’s National Basketball Association

Team History
2016 – Present / Dallas Wings
2010 – 2015 / Tulsa Shock

1998 – 2009 / Detroit Shock

Nickname
Shock – Tulsa Shock’s nickname is a carryover from Detroit. See the Detroit Shock nickname description.

Championship
WNBA Championships  0

Arena
2016 – Present / College Park Center

*Tulsa*
2010 – 2015 / BOK Center

*Detroit*
1998 – 2009 / The Palace of Auburn Hills

Owner
2016 – Present / Bill Cameron, Chris Christian and Mark Yancey
2010 – 2015 / Tulsa Pro Hoops LLC
1998–2009 / William Davidson

Who is the greatest Tulsa Shock?

Retired Number

Mascot

*Blue is this team’s history

Shock History Comments

 

 

  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •