• Breakers Team Formation

    The team started out in 1983 as the Boston Breakers, owned by Boston businessman George Matthews and former New England Patriots wide receiver Randy Vataha. However, finding a stadium proved difficult. The largest stadium in the region was Schaefer Stadium in Foxborough, home of the Patriots. However, it was owned by the Sullivan family, owners of the Patriots, and Matthews and Vataha were not willing to have an NFL team as their landlord. As a result, their initial choice for a home facility was Harvard Stadium, but Harvard University rejected them almost out of hand. They finally settled on Nickerson Field on the campus of Boston University, which seated only 21,000 people–far and away the smallest stadium in the league. The team’s cheerleaders were called “Heartbreakers.”

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The Boston Breakers were an American football team that played in the original United States Football League (USFL) in the mid-1980s.

Established
1983

City
Boston
– New Orleans – Portland

League History
1983 – 1986 / United States Football League

Team History
1985 / Portland Breakers
1984 / New Orleans Breakers
1983 / Boston Breakers

Nickname
Breakers – The Breakers nickname which means a heavy sea wave that breaks into white foam on the shore.

Original USFL Team
Yes

Final USFL Team
No

Team’s Final Outlook
Ultimately, stadium issues forced the Breakers out of town and move to New Orleans.

Championship
USFL Championship  0

Stadium
1985 / Civic Stadium

*New Orleans*
1984 / Louisiana Superdome

*Boston*
1983 / Nickerson Field

Owner
1985 / Joseph Canizaro
1984 / Joseph Canizaro and Randy Vataha
1983 / George Matthews and Randy Vataha

Coaches
1983 – 1985 / Dick Coury (25 wins – 29 losses)

Who is the greatest Boston Breakers?

Accomplishments
Averaged 12,817 fans (14,000 seat stadium)

*Blue is this team’s history

Breakers History Comments

 

 

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