• Move to Los Angeles – Now Called the Stars

    The Amigos lost $500,000 in their first season, largely due to poor attendance; they only averaged 1,500 fans per game in a 7,500-seat arena. Kim realized he did not have the resources to keep going and sold the team to construction company owner Jim Kirst, who moved the team as the Los Angeles Stars in 1968 and played at the Los Angeles Memorial Sports Arena in Los Angeles, The franchise made an attempt to sign legendary center Wilt Chamberlain. Chamberlain did not sign with the Stars (though he did later coach the ABA’s San Diego Conquistadors). With 33 wins and 45 losses, the Stars improved from their first season but again finished fifth in the Western Division and did not make the playoffs.

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The Los Angeles Stars were an American professional sports franchise that played in Los Angeles, California from 1968 until 1970 as a member of the American Basketball Association.

Established
1967

City
Anaheim – Los Angeles Salt Lake City

League History
1967 – 1976 / American Basketball Association

Team History
1970 – 1975 / Utah Stars
1968 – 1970 / Los Angeles Stars

1967 – 1968 / Anaheim Amigos

Nickname
Stars – The Los Angeles team's nickname is derived from all the local Hollywood stars.

Championship
ABA Championships  0
1971

Poll

Who is the greatest Los Angeles Stars?

Arena
*Utah*
1970 – 1975 / Salt Palace

*Los Angeles*
1968 – 1970 / Los Angeles Memorial Sports Arena

*Anaheim*
1967 – 1968 / Anaheim Convention Center

Owner
1975 / Snellen M. Johnson and Lyle E. Johnson
1974 – 1975 / James A. Collier
1970 – 1975 / Bill Daniels

1968 – 1970 / Jim Kirst
1967 – 1968 / Art Kim

Coaches
1975 / Tom Nissalke
1974 – 1975 / Bucky Buckwalter & Tom Nissalke
1973 – 1974 / Joe Mullaney
1971 – 1973 / LaDell Andersen
1969 – 1971 / Bill Sharman

1967 / Al Brightman/Harry Dinnel

*Blue is this team’s history

Stars History Comments

 

 

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