• Oakland Team Formation

    A few months after the first AFL draft in 1959, the owners of the yet-unnamed Minneapolis franchise accepted an offer to join the established National Football League as an expansion team (now called the Minnesota Vikings) in 1961, sending the AFL scrambling for a replacement. At the time, Oakland seemed an unlikely venue for a professional football team. The city had not asked for a team, there was no ownership group and there was no stadium in Oakland suitable for pro football the closest stadiums were in Berkeley and San Francisco and there was already a successful NFL franchise in the Bay Area in the San Francisco 49ers. However, the AFL owners selected Oakland after Los Angeles Chargers owner Barron Hilton threatened to forfeit his franchise unless a second team was placed on the West Coast. Accordingly, the city of Oakland was awarded the eighth AFL franchise on January 30, 1960, and the team inherited the Minneapolis club’s draft picks. A “name the team” contest was held by the Oakland Tribune, and the winner was the Oakland Señors. After a few weeks of being the butt of local jokes (and accusations that the contest was fixed, as Soda was fairly well known within the Oakland business community for calling his acquaintances “señor”), the fledgling team (and its owners) changed the team’s name nine days later to the Oakland Raiders, which had finished third in the naming contest. The original team colors were black, gold and white. The now-familiar team emblem of a pirate (or “raider”) wearing a football helmet was created, reportedly a rendition of actor Randolph Scott.

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  • AL Davis Takes over Ownership

    In 1972, while managing general partner Valley was attending the 1972 Summer Olympics in Munich, Davis drafted a revised partnership agreement that made him the new managing general partner, with near-absolute control over team operations. McGah signed the agreement. Since two of the team’s three general partners had voted in favor of the agreement, it was binding under partnership law of the time. Valley sued to overturn the agreement once he returned to the country, but was unsuccessful. Valley sold his interest in 1976, and from that point onward none of the other partners had any role in the team’s operations. This was despite the fact that Davis did not acquire a majority interest in the Raiders until 2005, when he bought the shares held by McGah’s family. At his death he owned approximately 67 percent of the team.

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  • Super Bowl XI Winner 1976

    Super Bowl XI was an American football game between the American Football Conference (AFC) champion Oakland Raiders and the National Football Conference (NFC) champion Minnesota Vikings to decide the National Football League (NFL) champion for the 1976 season. The Raiders defeated the Vikings by the score of 32–14 to win their first Super Bowl. The game was played on January 9, 1977, at the Rose Bowl in Pasadena, California.

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  • Super Bowl XV Winner 1980

    Super Bowl XV was an American football game between the American Football Conference (AFC) champion Oakland Raiders and the National Football Conference (NFC) champion Philadelphia Eagles to decide the National Football League (NFL) champion for the 1980 season. The Raiders defeated the Eagles by the score of 27–10, becoming the first wild card playoff team to win a Super Bowl.

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  • Back to Oakland

    On June 23, 1995, Davis signed a letter of intent to move the Raiders back to Oakland. The move was approved by the Alameda County Board of Supervisors the next month, as well as by the NFL. The move was greeted with much fanfare, and under new head coach Mike White the 1995 season started off well for the team. Oakland started 8–2, but injuries to starting quarterback Jeff Hostetler contributed to a six-game losing streak to end the season, and the Raiders failed to qualify for the playoffs for a second consecutive season.

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  • Al Davis Death, Mark Davis in Control

    Mark Davis inherited the team after the death of his father, Al, in 2011. Davis with his mother, Carol, own a 47 percent share of the Raiders, which is contractually structured to give them controlling interest. Davis has day-to-day control of the team.

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The Oakland Raiders are a professional American football franchise based in Oakland, California. The team commenced operations in 1960 as a member of the American Football League (AFL); they are currently members of the National Football League (NFL), which merged with the AFL in 1970. The Raiders currently belong to the Western Division of the NFL's American Football Conference and play their home games at the Oakland–Alameda County Coliseum.

Established
1960

City
Oakland - Los Angeles - Oakland - Las Vegas

League History
1970 - Present / National Football League
1960 - 1969 / American Football League

Team History
2020 - Present / Las Vegas Raiders
1995 - 2019 / Oakland Raiders
1982 - 1994 / Los Angeles Raiders
1960 - 1981 / Oakland Raiders

Nickname
Raiders - Chet Soda, Oakland’s first general manager, sponsored a name-the-team contest in 1960. Helen A. Davis, an Oakland policewoman, submitted the winning entry, Señors, and was rewarded with a trip to the Bahamas. The nickname, an allusion to the old Spanish settlers of northern California, was ridiculed in the weeks that followed, and fans also claimed that the contest was fixed. Scotty Stirling, a sportswriter for the Oakland Tribune who would later become the team’s general manager, provided another reason to abandon the nickname. “That’s no good,” Stirling said. “We don’t have the accent mark for the n in our headline type.” Responding to the backlash, Soda and the team’s other investors decided to change the team’s nickname to Raiders, which was a finalist in the contest along with Lakers.

Championship
Super Bowl  2
1983, 1981, 1977
AFL Championships 1
1967

Stadium
2020 - Present / Allegiant Stadium

*Oakland*
2019 - 2019 / RingCentral Coliseum
2016 - 2018 / Oakland-Alameda County Coliseum

2012 - 2015 / O.co Coliseum
2011 / Overstock.com Coliseum
2008 - 2011 / Oakland-Alameda County Coliseum
2004 - 2008 / McAfee Coliseum
1995 - 2004 / Network Associates Coliseum

*Los Angeles*
1982 - 1994 / Los Angeles Memorial Coliseum

*Oakland*
1966 - 1998 / Oakland-Alameda County Coliseum
1962 - 1965 / Frank Youell Field

*San Francisco*
1961 / Candlestick Park
1960 / Kezar Stadium and Candlestick Park

Owner
2011 - Present / Mark and Carol Davis
1983 - 2011 / Al Davis
1976 - 1983 / Al Davis and Ed McGah
1966 - 1976 / F. Wayne Valley, Ed McGah and Al Davis
1961 - 1966 / F. Wayne Valley and Ed McGah
1960 / Y. Charles (Chet) Soda

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Retired Number

Mascot
2013 - 2019 / Raider Rusher

*Blue is this team’s history

Raiders History Comments

 

 

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